Historic Downtown Pocatello
Shopping - Dining - Entertainment - History - Downtown

Experience Our Historic Buildings

Take a walk through Historic Downtown Pocatello and experience the history of our beautiful buildings, still standing today, where the past and present mix to create a vibrant historic district!

West Side Buildings

Pocatello High School
Trinity Episcopal Church
Valentine Building
Federal Building
North Building
Union Pacific Depot
Fargo Building
Central Building
Kane Building
Sonnenkalb Building
Seavers Building
Idaho Furniture Building
Franklin Building
Petersen's Furniture Building
W.O.W. Building
The Carnegie Library
Pocatello High School

300 N. Arthur Ave

This building is an excellent example of the workmanship and attitude of the people who designed and constructed it. Originally, the high school was constructed in 1892 of rusticated sandstone. Twenty-five years after a major fire in 1914, the building was essentially rebuilt in 1939 as a W.P.A. effort. Frank Paradice, a prominent Pocatello architect, re-designed the building in an Art Deco style, featuring elaborate brick and terra cotta details. During the 1991-92 school year the school's centennial was observed. In the mid-90's an exterior restoration modernized the building so it can continue to be used as one of the community's three high schools.

Trinity Episcopal Church

248 N. Arthur Ave

Completed in 1898, this church in Gothic Revival Style was the first stone Episcopal church in Idaho. It is one of the few 19th-century stone churches remaining in the state. Buttresses, lancet windows and arched portals add grace to the structure.

Valentine Building

100 S. Arthur Ave, location for The Valentine Ballroom

Also designed by Frank Paradice and built in 1916, the Valentine Building is of Neoclassical Revival style. It is distinguished by the white terra cotta facades and fine details, and is one of the best examples in the state of a terra cotta facade. The Valentine Building was constructed to house the First National Bank. Carl Valentine was a sheep rancher, who through his banking and real estate activities, became one of the most prominent businessmen in Southeastern Idaho.

Federal Building

150 S. Arthur Ave

This is the only building in the district which was built as a government facility. Constructed in 1916, the Federal Building is in excellent condition with the upper floors currently housing several professional offices. Originally this structure served as Pocatello's post office and federal office building.

North Building

Northwest corner of W. Lewis & S. Arthur Ave

Originally owned by George H. North, an early Pocatello clothier, the North Building on the northwest corner of Lewis and Arthur was built in 1916. Constructed of cream-colored brick, the structure has a sheet metal cornice. Commercial space is rented on the ground floor and apartments are located in the upper-story.

Union Pacific Depot

W. Bonneville and 200 S. UP Ave

The first floor of the Oregon Short Line passenger depot is constructed of dressed grey ashlar; the remainder is of red brick. Three massic round arches mark the street-side enterance; the brick over the arches is laid in a decorative herringbone pattern. Unaltered on the exterior, the depot also retains a great deal of its early interior design. In addition to housing the passenger depot, the building contained the offices of the Montana and Idaho divisions of the Oregon Short Line. U.S. President William Howard Taft attended the station's dedication, held on August 20, 1915.

Fargo Building

Main St., Station Square

Designed by Pocatello architect Frank Paradice and built in 1916, this two-story cream-colored brick building is topped by a sheet-metal cornice on both street facades. The second floor windows are all double-hung sash, and an atrium provides light for the second floor apartments. An addition to the south side of the building was completed before 1937 and features the same design as the original structure. The building originally opened on October 7, 1916, and housed the Fargo-Wilson-Wells Mercantile Company.

Central Building

105 S. Main St

The Central Building was designed by Pocatello architect Frank Paradice and was completed in the summer of 1929. The two-story commercial building features gold-brown contrast with black, blue, ivory, and gold terra cotta trim. Except for minor storefront window and sign alterations, the building is unaltered. 

Kane Building

315 W. Center St

Built in 1914, this cream-colored brick building features a large, bracketed terra cotta cornice and a terra cotta parapet. It was designed by Pocatello architect Charles B. Onderdonk. The Kane Building was named after its original owner, James F. Kane, who came to Pocatello in 1890 and established the largest grocery store in the city. The building was the first in Pocatello to have a passenger elevator. 

Sonnenkalb Building

125 N. Main St

Designed by Pocatello architect Marcus Crundfor, this two-storied cream-colored brick building was constructed in 1914 and 1915. Inter-connected with a secondary storefront at 312 West Center, the first floor of this structure originally housed the People's Store (a dry goods and clothing establishment). The second floor was occupied by professional offices, including those of the building owner Oscar Sonnenkalb, a German-born civil engineer, who was very prominent in the early development of Southeastern Idaho. 

Seavers Building

101 N. Main St

This building was constructed in 1900 and is in the Romanesque Revival Style. A large second-floor turret with crenulation crowns the building's unique corner entrance. This building is a great example of a restoration/renovation project of a structure formerly classified as "intrusive." Named for Charles Seavers, the building is best remembered as theTemple Pharmacy.

Idaho Furniture Building

102 N. Main St

This two-story rusticated sandstone building, built in 1892, is an example of the Richardson Romanesque Style and was one of the first stone buildings in Pocatello.  This structure, along with the Pioneer Block Building, represented a true commitment to Pocatello's new downtown.

Franklin Building

120 N. Main St

This two-story building was constructed in 1915 and was named for its first owner, N.G. Franklin. The first floor contained the Bannock National Bank, while the second floor served as a Knights of Pythias Hall. In the words of architect Frank Paradice, this Italian Renaissance Revival style building was "the first real terra cotta job in Pocatello."

Petersen's Furniture Building

224 N. Main St

Built in 1914 and constructed of cream-colored brick, this structure's facade is graced by a massive denticulated cornice. Originally owned by T.C. Martin, this building housed Petersen Furniture from 1921 to the late 1990's. Although the store front and transom windows have been remodeled, the original leaded glass P ornamentation on the second and third floor windows are intact. 

W.O.W. Building

230 N. Main St

Throughout the district you may find identification plaques at the top of buildings. These plates were often used to identify the year of construction, the owner, or the name of the establishment located within the structure. An interesting example of such a plaque is located on 233 North Main where the inscription of "W.O.W." can be seen. This building was constructed as a lodge hall for the "Woodmen of the World."

The Carnegie Library

101 N. Garfield Ave

Built with a $12,000 grant from Andrew Carnegie (Pittsburgh, PA steel magnate and philanthropist), this was Pocatello's first library and an outstanding example of Palladian Villa architecture.  The cornerstone was laid on October 16, 1907 and contains a letter from Carnegie, names of the mayor and city council members, coins of 1907, and copies of three local newspapers.  A modern addition built in 1993 allows the historic library to continue to serve the community.

East Side Buildings

Church-White Building
Auditorium Opera House
City Building
McNichols Building
Idello Hotel
309 E. Center Building
Church-White Building

300 E. Center St

This building was designed by Pocatello architect Frank H,. Paradice, Jr. and was under construction in the autumn of 1915. This building housed the People's Market which opened in 1918 and the Tourraine Hotel from 1920-1975. It also housed the Mikado Pool Hall and Barbershop during the 1920's which served Pocatello's Japanese community. This building was also known as the Nixon building after Samuel Nixon, the owner between the Great Depression and the 1950's.

Auditorium Opera House

237 E. Center St

This is a two-story brick building with stucco applied to its front wall in an Art Deco style suggested by the outset piers which punctuate the front wall. The Art Deco features date from a 1939 remodeling after a fire. The building originally contained three stories, but the third story was removed during the remodel project. This building was constructed in 1900 as the Auditorium Opera House which offered road shows, local amateur shows, vaudeville, and films. After 1929 the theater showed mostly films. After 1939 the buildings use was converted to a furniture store and Southeast Furniture occupied the building from 1944 to 2013.  It is now home to East Idaho Home Interiors.

City Building

210 E. Center St

This one-story building is brick with Art Deco terra cotta facades along 1st and Center Avenues. Until 1938 these buildings housed a variety of businesses, including Jewish entrepreneur Nate Block's clothing store. In 1938 the buildings were aquired by the City of Pocatello and remodeled into a city office building using PWA/WPA monies and an architectural design by Frank H. Paradice, Jr. In this project the Federal monies allowed the City to create its first full-fledged municipal building. 

McNichols Building

251 E. Center St

This three-story brick commercial block in the Renaissance Revival style contains a protruding cornice and column-like courses at the building's corners. The building was completed in 1915 even though parapet reads 1913. The store front has been radically remodeled with a modern awning, wood siding and small, single-pane windows. The building has been occupied by a variety of office and commercial tenants. Between 1927 and 1960 the Center Hotel was located in the upper floors.

Idello Hotel

246 E. Center St

This building first appears on the 1915 Sanborn map as a one-story brick building, but by 1921 two stories had been added and the building housed a hotel. This building is also associated with Greek, Japanese and Jewish businesses in early Pocatello history.

309 E. Center Building

309 E. Center St

This one-story brick building has a plain brick facade and retains the character, but not materials, of early twentieth-century storefronts. The building was erected between 1915 and 1921 and has housed cafes, bookstores, grocery and drug stores.

Explore Downtown Home Page
Restaurant & Antique Shopping Guide
Event Facilitites
Photo Gallery
Tours Home Page